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TOPIC: ARGUMENT200

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TOPIC: ARGUMENT200 - Statistics collected from dentists indicate that three times more men than women faint while visiting the dentist. This evidence suggests that men are more likely to be distressed about having dental work done than women are. Thus, dentists who advertise to attract patients should target the male consumer and emphasize both the effectiveness of their anesthetic techniques and the sensitivity of their staff to nervous or suffering patients.

WORDS: 292 TIME: 00:45:00 DATE: 2008/7/6 22:09:31

This statement asserts that according to a statistics collected from dentists, three times more men than women faint while visiting the dentist, and it also draws a conclusion that the dentists should emphasize both the effectiveness of their anesthetic techniques and the sensitivity of their staff to nervous or suffering patients.

Firstly, the statistics is inconvincible in statistic. We are lack of the information about the quantity of the dentists and the interviewing area. Lacking of these information, the statistics cannot be trusted. It is reasonable to assume that the samples of this statistics are been collected in the same blocks, which is not scientifically reliable.

Secondly, the statement fails to inform us about the symptoms of the patients before they are visiting the dentists. As we know, some diseases can lead to a sudden faint under some specific circumstances. Therefore, it is inconvincible that the evidence suggests that men are more likely to be distressed about having dental work done than women are.

Thirdly, to decrease faint in visiting the dentist has not any direct connections with improving anesthetic techniques and staff service. Maybe it is the anesthetic drug injections it selves that lead to more faint. Therefore, improving anesthetic techniques and staff service may not help to decrease the number of faint customers in visiting the dentist; the advertisement to attracting just male consumer cannot convince us.

In the final analysis, the statistics do not provide a convincible conclusion, and the dentists who advertise to attract patients cannot believe these results. To make the conclusion more reliable, we need to be informed about the details of the quantity of the statistic samples, and clarify that if there is any other possible reason to lead to the faint in visiting the dentist.

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